BAGHDAD, IRAQ - APRIL 24: Saf'aa Ahmed, 11, sits with the remainder of her right leg propped up at a hospital April 24, 2003 in Baghdad, Iraq. Saf'aa lost her left leg two weeks ago, from a missile attack on her neighborhood, according to her family. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

The Hidden Harm: Acquired Disability During Conflict

Disability regularly intersects with other vulnerabilities in conflict like gender and age to place persons with disabilities at significantly greater risk of harm compared to other civilians. Given that persons with disabilities are “invisible” in peacetime, it is therefore essential to ensure their inclusion in civilian protection processes and incumbent on governments and humanitarian organizations to recognize and address their needs during conflict.

Ellen Margrethe Løj, (on screen) Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the UN Peacekeepers Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), briefs the Council via video teleconference.

A Question of Accountability

United Nations peacekeeping troops often take the blame for mission failures, but a recent op-ed by Center for Civilians in Conflict (CIVIC)’s Peacekeeping Advisor Lauren Spink argues that the UN Security Council and Secretariat must share in accountability for peacekeeping operation failures and enact meaningful reform to support field operations.