WASHINGTON, DC— Aryeh Neier, president emeritus of the Open Society Foundations (OSF), will join the Center for Civilians in Conflict’s (CIVIC) Board of Directors, CIVIC announced today.

Neier, who has earned eminence during more than 50 years dedication to human rights and international justice issues, begins his service term this month. He brings extensive experience acquired during his distinguished tenure as president of OSF, executive director and co-founder of Human Rights Watch, and executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Over the past decade, the Center for Civilians in Conflict has worked for the better protection of civilians before, during, and after armed conflict, most notably in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Somalia, Mali, and the Central African Republic. CIVIC has become a widely acknowledged source of expertise for effective civilian protection policy and practice. It is a leading voice for civilians living in conflict throughout the world.

“At OSF, Aryeh championed the work of CIVIC, beginning with his approval of our initial grant,” said Anil Soni, chair of CIVIC’s Board. “His expertise is invaluable as we work to protect more civilians in conflicts across the globe.”

Neier is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and has also contributed to Foreign Policy, the New York Times, and the Washington Post. He is the author of seven books, including The International Human Rights Movement: A History (2012).

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Notes to editors:

Center for Civilians in Conflict (CIVIC)’s mission is to improve protection for civilians caught in conflicts around the world. We call on and advise international organizations, governments, militaries, and armed non-state actors to adopt and implement policies to prevent civilian harm. When civilians are harmed we advocate for the provision of amends and post-harm assistance. We bring the voices of civilians themselves to those making decisions affecting their lives.

For more information, contact Christopher Allbritton at +1 (917) 310-4785 or chris@civiliansinconflict.org.